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Here’s a quick review of our week on Molokai from the ridiculous

to the sublime…a gorgeous but sad view of Kalaupapa, the leper colony.  In the 1800’s people would bring those ill with leprosy and dump them into the surf and paddle away.  Sight of incredible suffering and breathtakingly beautiful.  After 1969, due to sulfa drugs, everyone was allowed to leave but a handful of people remain, people who were born there.

We drove the red jeep from one end of the island to the other, driving on almost every road past newly familiar sights

past the markers at our turn off

past the beach

and the thousand palm grove

into town, Kaunakaki, for supplies at the street market

or in Friendly’s grocery (behind the trees)

Walking around town provided delightful visual diversions:

this being my favorite.

Then back to the condo at Ke Nani Kai for lunch on the lanai before a swim in the wonderful pool

Ke Nani Kai on Kepuhi Bay used to be surrounded by a golf course going right down to the beach but in 2008 the water was turned off, and though the condos are beautifully maintained, the golf course is toast:

which gives one a certain marooned-at-the-oasis feeling…here the beach with a bit former golf course visible:

the truth is Molokai has issues resulting from years of growing pineapples which deplete the soil (no pineapples are grown here now…too expensive to ship from Hawaii) and water issues.  The entire eastern half of the island is totally arid.  We found a few places we loved including this native cemetary on a dirt road (island of Lanai visible in the background):

and the Hotel Molokai where you can get a good mai tai and enjoy the tiki torches at sunset:

and then it’s time to leave Molokai and head to Maui, so back into the tiny plane:

and then Aloha Molokai and Mahalo