October

Hi readers…it’s been two months since my last bulletin, and I’ll have to hustle to post this as October is about to become Hull birthday month, also known at November. I’ve been musing about why I rarely post on this blog anymore…the answer is Instagram. No narrative, just images…but the Snail Blog has provided me with some fall color…

My public life has become limited to home, studio, grocery store, occasionally a coffee…not quite as limited as a year ago before vaccinations and boosters, but limited. I HAVE ventured out to the Hallie Ford Museum of Art to see the Claudia Cave exhibit, and most recently to see the most excellent exhibit “Time in Place: Northwest Art from the Permanent Collection” curated beautifully and thoughtfully by HFMA Collections Curator Jonathan Bucci.

The exhibit is open until December 18, 2021, and gives the viewer a look at art of our region, both historic and contemporary, work of natives and latecomers. Bucci has made interesting combinations and choices showing us things that have not been shown in the museum until now, and juxtaposing them with things that have been on view. You can arrange to visit the museum Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5:00, and what a splendid time I had wandering and musing. Masks are necessary and it is a place I feel very comfortable visiting.

For me, the newly cleaned and framed section of a mural painted by Carl Hall is a knock out. The mural was originally painted for the Charles Wood house and in fact is a view toward Minto-Brown Island of the river at flood stage as seen from the Wood’s home where it graced the dining room wall for 50 years before being removed, conserved and donated to the museum.

And here is the Wood family on the road…

.After the exhibit the mural will be hung outside the Paulus Lecture Hall at the Willamette University Law School.

The Museum has collected work by many Native American artists and has current and historic work including this Fort Rock sandal fragment from 7000 BCE,

and Ramon Murillo’s “Dancing on the Lewis and Clark Trail”.

I was interested to see this drawing of an Andrew Vincent mural on the old Salem Post Office wall (now a State of Oregon office Building.)

And now I must admit to my incomplete photographing as the images excited me and I neglected to take down all the information (I’m out of practice for blogging, I’m afraid)…here are some things to go see…

And then, when you have looked and read and thought…go upstairs and see the two paintings on loan just now…a Richard Diebenkorn…

and a David Hockney paiinting of 2020, after Hobbema. Take your phone so you can look up the Hobbema painting “The Avenue at Middelharnis” of 1689. I’m not reproducing it here because the fun of it is standing in front of the Hockey and calling up the Hobbema…go see.

15 Comments

  1. What a grand way to start my day, Bonnie. Thank you for the overview of the exhibit. Stunning works.
    I’ve missed your blog.

  2. Thanks for sharing this, Bonnie. That Hockney is amazing and I’ve already cheated an looked up “The Avenue at Middelharnis.”

  3. Just last night i was thinking about you and how happy you must be to have the family so close….so, this morning i was thrilled to see you haven’t forgotten us! Your blogs are a treasure and certainly brighten my daze. Thank you for your insight and beautiful words. XOXO

  4. Thank you Bonnie. I loved the show and will be going back. The Carl Hall is a knockout for certain. As always I love your blogs.

  5. Thanks for the heads up. Going to see Josh and family in Germany so may not get to see what you have so enticingly recommended.
    Have a happy birthday month!

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